Events

  • When: Dec 13, 2018 - 8:30am - 4:30pm

    Location: Dartmouth campus (Hanover), The Class of 1978 Life Sciences Center, Oopik Auditorium (room 100)

    Description: This comprehensive, all-day presentation addresses both practical and conceptual aspects of writing NIH research grant and fellowship applications. It is appropriate for faculty members, postdoctoral researchers, and graduate students. Dr. Robertson will spend time focusing on writing a Specific Aims page, along with the research strategy. An emphasis is given to doing the “extra” things that can make the difference between success and failure.

    All participants will receive an extensive handout, as well as a copy of “The Grant Application Writer’s Workbook” (NIH version).

    To register please email: Grant.Proposal.Support@dartmouth.edu indicating your primary department and title.

    Registration deadline: Friday, November 16, 2018.

    NOTE: This is the first of two NIH grant-writing seminars being offered on successive days (December 13th and 14th).
    Dec 14th workshop: Write Winning NIH CDA Proposals

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  • When: Dec 14, 2018 - 8:30am - 12:00pm

    Location: Dartmouth campus (Hanover), The Class of 1978 Life Sciences Center, Room 201

    Description: This half-day seminar is for Career Development Award (CDA) candidates and their mentors. It emphasizes the partnering between candidate, mentor and institution that is necessary to make these proposals successful, resulting in protected time for research. The National Institutes of Health’s mentored K Awards, and F32 National Research Service Award for individual post-doctoral fellows, are used as representative applications; the principles and fundamentals learned are transposable to the CDAs of other agencies – only the specifics vary.

    Content of the seminar includes tips and strategies on getting reference letters; selecting and getting the most from a mentor; how review criteria can be used to inform the writing of a CDA; the kinds of research and training that should be proposed, and much, much more.

    NOTE: If you haven’t previously attended the “Write Winning NIH Grant Proposals” seminar, you are strongly encouraged to attend the all-day seminar on Thursday, December 13, 2018. See https://synergy.dartmouth.edu/Write-Winning-NIH-Grant-Proposals for information and to sign up for the Dec 13 seminar. All participants will receive an extensive handout, as well as a copy of “The Grant Application Writer’s Workbook” (NIH version).

    To register please email: Grant.Proposal.Support@dartmouth.edu indicating your primary department and title.

    Registration deadline: Friday, November 16, 2018.

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  • When: Dec 14, 2018 - 9:00am - 10:00am

    Location: Center for Technology and Behavioral Health
    Aquarium Conference Room
    46 Centerra Parkway, Suite 315, Lebanon, NH

    Description: Using wearables and apps to study human sleep and circadian (daily) rhythms
    Nearly every physiological process in our body is under the control of our daily (circadian) clock. We spend 1/3 of our lives asleep. The discovery of the physiology of sleep and circadian timekeeping have received much attention (including the 2017 Nobel Prize). We have developed mathematical tools and models to translate this knowledge into smartphone and wearable applications. This work is included in an open access project to deliver the first real-time estimates of the state of one’s circadian clock and improved methods for scoring sleep. In particular, our smartphone app, ENTRAIN (www.entrain.org), which has been installed in phones over 200,000 times in over 100 countries, simulates models and employs optimized schedules to help workers and transmeridian travelers overcome jetlag. The app resulted in one of the largest studies of human sleep yet conducted. I will highlight current applications of this work including projects to: 1) reduce depression and stress in thousands of medical interns, 2) time chemotherapy so that it is maximally effective and has minimal side effects, 3) understand gender and racial disparities in sleep, 4) improve the performance of student athletes and 5) understand mood dynamics in individuals with Bipolar Disorder.

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  • When: Dec 19, 2018 - 5:00pm - 5:00pm

    Location: Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center conference rooms

    Description:

    Are you planning on applying for a pilot grant?
    Do you need help framing your research question and defining your plans?


    The goal of the Research Development Workshop is to guide investigators new to research in the development of their Specific Aims for a grant funding application. Investigators will also be prepared to apply for other SYNERGY educational and career development opportunities.

    WHAT: A four-session tutorial on developing your clinical translational research project aims.

    WHEN: Four Wednesday evenings in March, 4:00 - 6:00 pm (Dates: March 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2019)

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  • When: Feb 7, 2019 - 8:00am - 5:00pm

    Location: Natcher Auditorium, NIH campus, Bethesda, MD

    Description: This National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)-sponsored The Opioid Crisis and the Future of Addiction and Pain Therapeutics: Opportunities, Tools, and Technologies Symposium will highlight challenges and opportunities throughout the discovery and development process for addiction- and pain-related medications in the pre-competitive preclinical stage and provide a framework for more focused efforts within the research community. There has been a dramatic increase in individuals who abuse and subsequently become addicted to opiates. The current "opioid crisis" is now a public health burden resulting in deaths, debilitation and significant social and economic impact. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) Initiative addresses multiple challenges, including the development of currently unavailable non-addictive pain medications, medical interventions for opioid overdose and new addiction treatments. The development of such medications requires concerted efforts among many researchers to enable the discovery and validation of new targets, pathways, biomarkers and therapeutic candidates. The success of such discoveries will rely heavily on the availability of biologically, physiologically and pharmacologically relevant reagents, assays, model systems and validated probe compounds that need to be both reproducible and highly predictive of efficacy in humans.

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